Category: News

Listen to Dr. Russell Jaffe’s Interview on The Dr. Leslie Show

Monday, July 25th at 11:30 am ET and re-airing at 6:30 PM ET, Dr. Russell Jaffe will appear on The Dr. Leslie Show on WSIC 100.7 FM/1400AM to discuss the important topic of “Stop fighting with disease and start healing”. 

The Dr. Leslie Show, which is about living well naturally… bringing education and inspiration towards leading a healthy, holistic life including the mind, body and spirit, can also be heard via ITunes, Blog Talk Radio, TuneIn.com and www.bridgeholistichealing.com/radio.aspx.

100.7 wsic

The Dr. Leslie Show can be heard on the No. 1 listened to Radio Station in 5 North Carolina counties including Iredell, Alexander, Catawba, Davie, and Wilkes County, with a reported daily listenership of over 70,000 people. Additionally, their global online audience spans over 190 countries.

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Tasty Greens Salad with Sweet Dressing Recipe (Serves 4-6)

Salad greens can make a fabulous nutrient-rich meal, yet be light. The number of greens you can include in a salad are numerous. Whether it’s collard or sorrel, spinach or arugula , they all provide copious amounts of fiber, B vitamins, antioxidants, and minerals like calcium, magnesium and potassium.

Enjoy this tasty greens salad that is topped with nectarines, mint, grape seed oil and more!

Ingredients:

2 cups garden sorrel leaves, washed
1 head red leaf lettuce or butter lettuce, torn into bite-size pieces
¾ cup nectarines, thinly sliced
3 tbsp white wine vinegar
1 tbsp grape-seed oil
2 tbsp maple syrup
¾ tsp Dijon mustard
2 tbsp shallot, minced
1 tbsp fresh mint, finely chopped
1 tbsp chives, finely minced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

In a large bowl, combine the sorrel, lettuce, and nectarines. Whisk together the rest of the ingredients in a small bowl and season. Drizzle the dressing over salad, toss lightly, and serve.

Even the healthiest recipes might not be healthy for you. LRA tests help you know the foods that are healthy – immune-tolerant – for you. Learn more about LRA tests at www.ELISAACT.com.

Dr. Russell Jaffe Interview With Natural Medicine Journal Discussing Early and Proactive Detection and Treatment of Insulin Resistance

“Insulin resistance has now reached endemic levels,” explains integrative health expert Russell Jaffe, MD, PhD, CCN. In this sponsored podcast, Dr. Jaffe describes effective ways for clinicians to identify and treat insulin resistance. He also describes how to motivate patients to comply with treatment.

You can listen to the full interview on Natural Medicine Journal’s website.

Russell M. Jaffe, MD, PhD, is CEO and Chairman of PERQUE Integrative Health (PIH). He is considered one of the pioneers of integrative and regenerative medicine. Since inventing the world’s first single step amplified (ELISA) procedure in 1984, a process for measuring and monitoring all delayed allergies, Jaffe has continually sought new ways to help speed the transition from our current healthcare system’s symptom reactive model to a more functionally integrated, effective, and compassionate system. PIH is the outcome of years of Dr. Jaffe’s scientific research. It brings to market 3 decades of rethinking safer, more effective, novel, and proprietary dietary supplements, supplement delivery systems, diagnostic testing, and validation studies.

About PERQUE Integrative Health

Perque Integrative Health

PERQUE Integrative Health (PIH) is dedicated to speeding the transition from sickness care to healthful caring. Delivering novel, personalized health solutions, PIH gives physicians and their patients the tools needed to achieve sustained optimal wellness. Combining the best in functional, evidence-based testing with premium professional supplements and healthful lifestyle guides, PIH solutions deliver successful outcomes in even the toughest cases.

Quinoa and Berries Recipe

An ancient grain of the Incas, quinoa is hugely popular all over the world today. It is rich in fiber, a complete protein (rare for a plant) and a storehouse of nutrients like iron, magnesium, lysine and riboflavin. Since it is chewier than other grains, it creates a sense of fullness that can often help with weight loss. Additionally, it appeals to all given that it’s gluten free.

Quinoa cooks quickly and is very versatile – it can be enjoyed as main or side dishes, salads or breakfast recipes. We combine quinoa with an assorted berry mix in this breakfast bowl version for an additional antioxidant pop and lace it with maple-syrup and cinnamon for that hint of sweetness.

Ingredients:

1 cup quinoa
2 cups water
1 2-inch cinnamon stick or ¾ tsp ground cinnamon
2-3 tbsp maple syrup

Tasty Options:

½ cup blueberries, raspberries, or strawberries
2 tbsp raisins
1 tsp lime or lemon zest
¼ tsp freshly grated nutmeg
3 tbsp whipped coconut cream
2 tbsp chopped cashews or nuts of choice
Optional yogurt (sheep or goat yogurt preferred) and maple syrup sweetener to taste

Place the grain in a fine-mesh strainer and rinse well. Combine the water and grain in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Add the cinnamon stick, if using. Cover, reduce heat, and simmer for 15 minutes, or until the liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat and fluff with a fork. Add cinnamon and maple syrup to taste and then add one or more of your favorite tasty options.

Even the healthiest recipes might not be healthy for you. LRA tests help you know the foods that are healthy – immune-tolerant – for you. Learn more about LRA tests at www.ELISAACT.com.

The Mind and Body

The mind and body are very closely connected- emotional, mental, social, spiritual, and behavioral factors can directly affect our health.  The mind-body connection means that our thoughts, feelings, beliefs, and attitudes can positively or negatively affect our biological functioning. In other words, our minds can affect how healthy our bodies are!

On the other hand, what we do with our physical body (what we eat, how much we exercise, even our posture) can impact our mental state (positively or negatively). This results in a complex interrelationship between our minds and bodies.

Mind-body specialist Dr. James Gordon states that the mind and body are essentially inseparable: “the brain and peripheral nervous system, the endocrine and immune systems, and indeed, all the organs of our body and all the emotional responses we have, share a common chemical language and are constantly communicating with one another.”

So, while you’re working on improving your ability to cope with stress and anxiety, the positive effects may also be seen in more effective blood sugar management or strengthening your immune system or digestion.

The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH) lists some techniques that are considered mind-body therapies or practices:

  • Meditation
  • Prayer
  • Creative arts therapies (art, music, or dance)
  • Yoga
  • Biofeedback
  • Tai chi
  • Qigong
  • Relaxation
  • Hypnosis
  • Guided imagery

Some therapies like Taichi, Qigong and Yoga are called ‘body-mind” therapies.

Ultimately, mind-body and body-mind therapies are interrelated: the body affects the mind, which in turn impacts the body (and the mind.)

“In essence, mindfulness involves quieting and then focusing or directing the mind. This can create a mental space that has been described as “absence of a problem.” The practice of non-attachment or witnessing helps us to observe life without being overwhelmed by the challenge or situation at hand. Since most of us can only focus on one thing at a time, if we are meditating, we’re also less likely to be worrying. Shifting into a state of pure awareness can provide a personal retreat, a place of peace, and a refuge that allows inner reconciliation.”

Read more about practices like these in the Joy in Living the Alkaline Way and elevate your health status to a new level.

The body-mind connection

The mind and body are very closely connected-   there is a powerful bond   through which emotional, mental, social, spiritual, and behavioral factors can directly affect health.   Thoughts can positively influence the body’s physical responses, thereby decreasing stress and so we usually think the mind is in control and it tells the body what to do. While still very true, more and more research now shows the prominence and utmost importance of a body –mind connection.

Latest scientific evidence talks about the body’s influence on our psyche*. Movement is extremely important for cognitive development and enhancement for babies, young children adults and the elderly alike. Mobile kids hit cognitive milestones faster and in older adults exercise promotes healthy aging mentally and physically. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157467/).

Ask us about the “The Joy of Living” – a useful handbook that discusses some simple, satisfying mind-body activities which adequately compliments any individualized  therapeutic program.

Walking is a perfect exercise, whether you are drawn to brisk walking or simply ambling, preferably in a place of beauty and serenity for at least 45 minutes every other day. Walking for benefit increases circulation and oxygen levels. Deep, slow in and out breaths, even while walking slowly, accelerates the lymph flow, which is a major detoxification system of the body. Walking can also be linked to deep relaxation, mindfulness practice, or meditation, further activating the body’s innate healing capacities.

-Excerpt from “The Joy of Living”

Cashew Dip Recipe

Native to Brazil’s Amazon, the “Cashew” nut is packed with energy, antioxidants, minerals and vitamins that are essential for robust health. It contains healthy monounsaturated fat that helps to reduce high triglyceride levels, promoting good cardiovascular health. Among others, it is rich in minerals like magnesium, potassium, zinc and selenium that support healthy muscles and bones in the body, provide antioxidant support and deliver co-factor assistance in various important enzymatic functions. It is also a storehouse of many B complex vitamins that are essential for optimum metabolism of proteins, fats and carbohydrates.

This simple Cashew dip recipe provides all the goodness of cashew laced with coconut water that contains easily digested carbohydrate in the form of sugar and electrolytes. Enjoy as a snack with organic fruit, vegetables or tortilla chips.

Ingredients:

1 cup raw cashews
1 tsp coconut oil
1 tbsp raw honey

Combine ingredients in a food processor and blend until smooth (add 1-2 tbsp coconut water to get desired consistency).

Even the healthiest recipes might not be healthy for you. LRA tests help you know the foods that are healthy – immune-tolerant – for you. Learn more about LRA tests at www.ELISAACT.com.

The body-mind connection

The mind and body are very closely connected-   there is a powerful bond   through which emotional, mental, social, spiritual, and behavioral factors can directly affect health.   Thoughts can positively influence the body’s physical responses, thereby decreasing stress and so we usually think the mind is in control and it tells the body what to do. While still very true, more and more research now shows the prominence and utmost importance of a body –mind connection.

Latest scientific evidence talks about the body’s influence on our psyche*. Movement is extremely important for cognitive development and enhancement for babies, young children adults and the elderly alike. Mobile kids hit cognitive milestones faster and in older adults exercise promotes healthy aging mentally and physically. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4157467/).

Ask us about the “The Joy of Living” – a useful handbook that discusses some simple, satisfying mind-body activities which adequately compliments any individualized  therapeutic program.

Walking is a perfect exercise, whether you are drawn to brisk walking or simply ambling, preferably in a place of beauty and serenity for at least 45 minutes every other day. Walking for benefit increases circulation and oxygen levels. Deep, slow in and out breaths, even while walking slowly, accelerates the lymph flow, which is a major detoxification system of the body. Walking can also be linked to deep relaxation, mindfulness practice, or meditation, further activating the body’s innate healing capacities.

-Excerpt from “The Joy of Living”

Sunflower Dressing Recipe

Sunflower seeds are an excellent source of vitamin E – the body’s key fat soluble antioxidant that provides cardio protective and anti-inflammatory benefits. Along with providing generous amounts of the primary alkalinizing mineral  magnesium, sunflower seeds are also a good  source of the antioxidant selenium that aids in detoxification, B vitamins like thiamin and niacin, and phytosterols-botanical compounds that aid in cholesterol balance.

This creamy yet healthy dressing recipe combines the natural goodness of raw sunflower seeds with the delicate flavors of tarragon and thyme – two highly aromatic and antioxidant laden herbs.

Ingredients:

1 cup raw sunflower seeds, presoaked for 8 hours
1 cup spring water or light vegetable stock
Juice of 2 lemons
½ bunch parsley, chopped
2 scallions, chopped
2 cloves garlic, chopped
Sea salt or tamari (wheat free)
2 Tbsp fresh tarragon or ½ tsp dried thyme
Pour 1/2 cup of water or stock into blender; add lemon juice, parsley, scallions, garlic, salt or tamari, and tarragon or thyme. Blend well.

Add ¼ cup of sunflower seeds and blend again. Slowly add remaining sunflower seeds and water. Continue blending until you have a smooth, creamy dressing. If the dressing is too thick, add additional water.

Refrigerate before serving.

Even the healthiest recipes might not be healthy for you. LRA tests help you know the foods that are healthy – immune-tolerant – for you. Learn more about LRA tests at www.ELISAACT.com.

Autism with intellectual disability linked to mother’s immune dysfunction during pregnancy

doctor

A mother’s health affects her baby’s health in more than one way. When the immune system is burdened and inflammation is present, the body tends to produce amounts of inflammatory chemical messengers called cytokines and chemokines. If this were the scenario in a pregnant woman, her baby could be at a heightened risk for autism with intellectual disability. A recent research study conducted by the UC Davis Mind Institute attempted to show this connection.

When the immune system is burdened, repair is deferred and the body turns on a defense mode. This creates an environment that leads to heightened development of delayed hypersensitivities. Using the LRA by ELISA/ACT testing, identifying these delayed hypersensitivities is easy and efficient and by following the complete LRA by ELISA/ACT immune enhancement program, unburdening the immune system can be successfully achieved.

Read the full press release below:

University of California – Davis Health System

Pregnant women with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, proteins that control communication between cells of the immune system, may be at significantly greater risk of having a child with autism combined with intellectual disability, researchers with the UC Davis MIND Institute have found.

The research also suggests a potential immune profile for the differentiation of autism combined with intellectual disability, as distinct from either autism or developmental disability alone.

“Inflammation during the second trimester in the mothers of children with autism who also have intellectual disability was significantly greater than in mothers of children autism without intellectual disability in our study,” said Judy Van de Water, professor of Internal Medicine in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology and a researcher affiliated with the UC Davis MIND Institute.

“However, equally significant was that profiles of mothers whose children go on to be diagnosed with autism and intellectual disability differed markedly from those whose children have intellectual disability without autism, as well as from the typically developing general population,” said Van de Water, director of the UC Davis Center for Children’s Environmental Health and the study’s senior author.

“Their profiles are distinct from all of the other groups that we studied, based on their cytokine and chemokine profiles,” Van de Water continued. “This finding suggests an avenue that we will explore to potentially identify possible markers to separate sub-phenotypes in the autism population.”

The study is published online in Molecular Psychiatry, a Nature publication.

Chemokines have been shown to regulate the migration, proliferation and differentiation of neuronal cells, and studies have identified the roles of specific cytokines during neurodevelopment, such as influencing neurogenesis, neuronal and glial cell migration, proliferation, differentiation and synaptic maturation and pruning.

The large, diverse, population-based study was conducted using blood serum samples obtained from the California Department of Public Health of mothers in the Kaiser Permanente Early Markers for Autism Study — 184 whose children developed autism and intellectual disability (previously known as mental retardation), 201 who had children with autism without intellectual disability, 188 whose children had developmental disability alone and 428 general population control participants.

The largely Southern California-based study was designed to evaluate biomarkers for autism. Women were eligible for participation if they delivered their infants between July 2000 and September 2003. The participants were largely from Orange, San Diego or Imperial counties.

The researchers examined the mothers’ mid-gestational blood serum levels of 22 different cytokines and chemokines, including GM-CSF, IL-1Alpha, IL-6, and IFN-Gamma.

“The fact that we see this increase in inflammatory markers with the autism/intellectual disability group compared with all of the other reference groups is striking, because the ones we’re seeing that are affected are usually down-regulated during the second trimester of pregnancy,” said Karen L. Jones, study first author and a post-doctoral fellow in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Clinical Immunology. “This really is suggesting that there is a lack of the immune regulation in these moms that is typically associated with a healthy pregnancy.”

The authors postulate that alterations in the gestational immune environment among mothers of children autism with intellectual disability may lead to alterations in the neurodevelopmental trajectory of the developing fetus, which may subsequently result in the altered behavioral phenotype characteristic of children with autism and intellectual disability.

The researchers noted that maternal immune activation represents one of several pathways that can result in differences in maternal cytokines, including environmental toxicants such as pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers. Mid-gestational maternal cytokine and chemokine levels also may interact with other potential risk factors, such as parental genetics.

“It is particularly exciting that this work does start to tease apart a potential source of differences in autism with and without intellectual disability, as well as from intellectual disability without autism,” Jones said.

“This study is incredibly valuable because it helps us understand more about the sources of variability within autism spectrum disorder, providing important insights into the different neurobiological mechanisms underlying important subtypes of the disorder,” said Leonard Abbeduto, director of the MIND Institute.

“At the same time, the study reinforces the importance of the maternal immune system in to a host of child outcomes. Most importantly, this study brings us closer to knowing how to prevent adverse developmental outcomes,” he said.

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Other study authors include Luke S. Heuer, Robin L. Hansen and Paul Ashwood of UC Davis; Lisa A. Croen, Ousseny Zerbo, Cathleen K. Yoshida and Gerald N. DeLorenze of the Division of Research, Kaiser Permanente — Northern California; Martin Kharrazi of the California Department of Public Health and Robert H. Yolken of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

The study was funded by grants 3R01ES016669 from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, SR01MH072565 from the National Institute of Mental Health, and US4HD079125 from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Research Center.

At the UC Davis MIND Institute, world-renowned scientists engage in collaborative, interdisciplinary research to find the causes of and develop treatments and cures for autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), fragile X syndrome, 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental disorders. For more information, visit http://www.ucdmc.ucdavis.edu/mindinstitute/

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